10 Inspirational Quotes for Use as Responses to Unsolicited Parenting Advice

Here’s how happy I am about being pregnant: it’s a real struggle to avoid using the phrase “over the moon.” Given that I spent a solid 20 percent of my pre-pregnant life making fun of people who say stuff like that, it’s pretty clear that I’m delirious with hormones and love.

And a good thing it is, too, because it I weren’t, I might be annoyed about all the advice I’ve been getting, much of it from perfect strangers. I was safe for the first four months, when it looked like maybe I’d just had a burrito for lunch, but now it’s obvious that I’m pregnant. I own a lot of shirts with ruching all of a sudden, and sometimes I knock things off shelves with my stomach. Plus, I groan a fair amount. I’m a clear target for busybodies.

To be totally honest with you, I’m not a big fan of life advice even when I’m not pregnant. Career advice? Sure. Recommendations about auto repair places, dentists, restaurants, or vacation destinations? Send ‘em my way! Advice about how to live my life generally? Hard pass. I try not to give this kind of advice, and when people offer theirs unsolicited, I grit my teeth and escape as soon as possible.

If there’s one thing I’ve learned so far — and really, it might be stretching it to claim that I’ve learned even one thing — it’s that no one really knows what anyone else should do in their personal lives. There are just too many variables, and it’s too hard to put ourselves in each other’s shoes. The right answer for me might be the wrong answer for you, or the lady down the street or the guy at the market.

But that doesn’t stop the advice-givers, who are sure that every pregnant person and parent needs their insight desperately.

“Thank God I went mini-golfing today,” they must think to themselves. “Otherwise that pregnant woman wrangling four kids might not know that she should be avoiding gluten in order to get at least one child who can behave in public.”

People who give unsolicited parenting advice should be flogged, is what I’m saying. But since that’s illegal and immoral, and since I usually think of the best retorts when I’m in my car 20 minutes after an interaction with a buttinsky, I’ve decided to rely on literature to help me get through.

With this in mind, I’ve gathered the following list of inspirational quotes, mostly drawn from Victorian literature, with the occasional Romantic or contemporary writer thrown in. Because if society is going to pretend that every single minor parenting decision carries enormous, life-changing weight, we might as well respond appropriately.

I hope you’re eating well for that baby! (Or: Here’s what your baby/toddler/5-year-old/teenager should be eating, and why doing anything different is child abuse.)

“At present I cannot spare energy and nerve force for digestion.” – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

You should really at least try to breastfeed. Breast is best!

“This is the end of the line for you and the rest of your ilk. We shall no longer seek the counsel of false matriarchs, keepers of the Old Order, quislings whose sole power derives from the continuing bondage of their sisters. Like the dinosaurs, your bodies will fuel the new society, where each woman shall be sovereign, and acknowledge her rage, and validate her neighbor’s rage, and rejoice in everybody’s rage, and caper and dance widdershins beneath the gibbous moon.” – Jincy Willett

Let me tell you about the advantages of natural childbirth/unassisted birth/dolphin doulas.

“And if no Lethe flows beneath your casement, And when ten years have not brought full effacement, Philosophy was wrong, and you may meet.” – John Crowe Ransom

Have you thought about sleep training? (Or: Don’t let that baby cry it out. That’s child abuse!)

“In his house at R’lyeh dead C’thulhu waits dreaming.” – H.P. Lovecraft

You absolutely must get a nanny/do daycare/stay home until the child is X months or years old/become a stay-at-home-mom.

“Life is not a matter of holding good cards, but of playing a poor hand well.” – Robert Louis Stevenson

Whatever you do, don’t worry. If you get stressed out while you’re pregnant, you’ll give birth to a litter of rabbits … and the rabbits will all die.

“Memory haunts me from age to age, and passion leads me by the hand–evil have I done, and with sorrow have I made acquaintance from age to age, and from age to age evil shall I do, and sorrow shall I know till my redemption comes.” – H. Rider Haggard

Does your child do sports/take music and art classes/know sign language and Mandarin/have SAT prep built into her preschool program?

“I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will.” – Charlotte Bronte

I can’t help but notice that your child has a behavioral and/or medical issue. Have you tried essential oils/prayer/a vegan diet/family calisthenics/moving to a yurt?

“Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.” – Friedrich Nietzsche

How much screen time do you permit your child? (BUZZER NOISE.) Wrong.

“I know you despise me; allow me to say, it is because you do not understand me.” – Elizabeth Gaskell

You know, you should really take care of yourself. I do yoga/train for marathons/fast every other day, and I lost the baby weight 45 minutes after giving birth.

“Fuck you.” – Unknown

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“Why is this goose talking at us?”

Image: Mother Goose ABC, New York: McLoughlin Bros, 1891, via Pinterest

 

 

 

 

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Hey, Here’s a Question: How Does Anyone Afford a Kid in This Country?

Did you know that about a quarter of American women return to work within two weeks of giving birth? It’s true. Twelve percent take a week or less.

This means, as John Oliver pointed out when the report revealing this terrifying statistic dropped two years ago, that nearly 1 in 4 women are forced to return to work before they’re even healed, never mind psychologically ready to return. (Or confident that their baby is ready to be left with a caretaker.)

I knew all this before I started trying to get pregnant, of course. In fact, I spent a long time talking about it with my therapist when agonizing over the fact that I really, really wanted a baby, despite it being just about the stupidest thing you can do in American society today from a practical perspective.

A few sample convos, to illustrate my dilemma:

 

Conversation 1: Financial Realities

Me: Did you know that infant care in the greater New York area costs $400 a week?

Therapist: I did know that, yes.

Me: Who has the money for that?

Therapist: No one, really. And yet, people pay it.

Me: I assume that the bulk of it goes to the actual caregivers, who are frequently women of color and/or recent immigrants to this great nation.

(Therapist and I laugh uproariously in unison … and then pause in silence to consider the torment of modern life.)

 

Conversation 2: A Horror Movie

Me: Here’s another problem.

Therapist: Mmm-hmm.

Me: I don’t want to put my baby in infant care.

Therapist: I don’t blame you.

Me: They don’t even have neck control yet.

Therapist: It’s true.

Me: Also, every time you hear a horrible story about a baby dying in daycare, doesn’t it seem like two things are true? 1. The facility was unlicensed, or the license had lapsed; 2. The baby was about a minute old.

Therapist: It’s really terrible. We’re the only industrialized country that thinks this is OK.

Me: And then when something happens, everyone blames the mother, who didn’t even want to put her month-old baby in daycare.

Therapist: Well, I hate to tell you, but people often blame the mother. Period.

Me: I hate humans. Animals are way better.

Therapist: Mmm-hmm.

 

Conversation 3: Anxiety

Me: If I hear one more story about how middle-class parents are ruining their children with their anxiety….

Therapist: Oh, I know. Why would they possibly be anxious?

Me: Ha ha ha. HA. Ha ha. Ha ha ha?

 

I’m bringing all this up now because I thought I was really clever and it turns out I’m not. I’m a freelancer, so prior to getting pregnant, I purchased a disability policy that covered maternity leave. Today, I decided to confirm with the insurance company that said policy was still in effect — I pay my premiums, but you never know — and also to see about the claim and coverage situation.

Are you ready for this? My policy, which again, I pay every month, entitles me to four weeks at half pay … if I have a C-section. For a vaginal birth, I’ll get two weeks.

Now, you can say that I should have already known this, having carefully done my research when I purchased the policy, and you’d be right. However, I just want to point out again the absurdity of anyone thinking that someone who recently gave birth should be up and ready to go two weeks later.

Things aren’t as bad as they could be, because Adam gets paid parental leave, thanks to New York State’s new legislation. I’m also banking money now, during my pregnancy, to support a self-funded leave. I’m lucky to be able to do that, and I’ll probably be able to swing two months off.

I’ll also be better off than most new moms even when my leave is up, because I’m my own boss and have a flexible schedule. So I won’t have to choose between a part-time job with no career path and a full-time job that won’t let me see my kid. This is a tremendous gift, and one I’m grateful for every single day.

But I find myself thinking a lot lately about countries with decent parental leave. In Sweden, for example, parents get 480 days of paid parental leave — and 90 days have to be used by each parent. What a difference a year-plus would make!

Alas, we live here, in the country that absolutely doesn’t want you to have access to birth control or abortion, but also does not give two shits in a hat about that baby once it’s born. There’s a lot on my list of things to protest right now, but these facts are near the top. Of course, it’s hard to take to the streets when you’re working constantly or healing as quickly as possible so that you can get back to work ASAP.

Come to think of it, that’s probably the point.

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